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how to help a teenager with social anxietyHigh school can be difficult for teens suffering from social anxiety.

Students are often under immense pressure to meet school requirements, adjust to changing bodies, and cope with their expectations. There are ways to combat social anxiety and still enjoy being a teenager.

It takes time to manage social anxiety. It starts with being open to doing something about it, and not accepting it as reality.

These 7 tips will help your teenager overcome social anxiety once they have made the decision to do so.

 

1. Remember, you’re not alone

Teens with social anxiety can feel isolated and helpless. There are many people with similar fears.

Anxiety is normal. Anxiety is a normal response to fear and discomfort that has been ingrained in our DNA since we were born. In fact, more than half of Ontario’s youth have admitted to missing school due to anxiety disorder. There are many reasons for this epidemic. However, struggling teens can find some relief in knowing they are not the only ones.

Remind your teen that they are normal and expected to feel these anxieties the next time they find themselves in a difficult social setting. Teens with social anxiety have overcome their fears and so can they.

2. 2. Practice breathing exercises

Stressful situations can cause breathing problems. This in turn causes more stress and triggers other physical problems. Anxiety can cause dizziness, lightheadedness and disorientation, as well as fainting. Your teen’s social anxiety can quickly become a medical problem.

Teens with social anxiety need to confront their fears face-to-face. Otherwise, there is a high chance of them becoming adults with the disorder.

You can help your child calm down and decrease anxiety by doing simple breathing exercises. If stress starts to creep in, it’s time to take a deep breath and get centered.

Encourage your teen’s to close her eyes, take deep breaths and close her eyes. You can count to 10 on your exhale, and see all the tension disappearing with the breath.

Mindfulness Meditation is a great option for those who want to meditate guided. They’ll feel calmer, more ready to face any situation in a matter of minutes.

3. Face your fears head-on

Avoiding difficult situations is not always the best option. Sometimes, it’s not possible.

Many cognitive therapists have successfully used desensitization. Teens suffering from social anxiety develop coping skills by being exposed to stressful, triggering situations. These triggers can be reduced by repetition and patience.

It doesn’t mean your fears will disappear completely if you face them head-on. It gives you the ability to overcome them, and the confidence that you can do it again.

Teens with Social Anxiety

 

4. Combat Negative Self-Talk

Your teenager should learn how to examine their inner monologue. They will tell themselves more about their social skills the more they believe it.

The words we use to express ourselves have a lot of power. Teens with social anxiety may find it natural to view past experiences through a negative perspective.

Positive thinking has many medical benefits. People who are more optimistic tend to have lower levels of stress and depression, live longer, have healthier hearts, and are happier.

People could become sick by dwelling on the negative. It will take effort and practice to reduce social anxiety.

Your teen can be your biggest cheerleader. You might find it hard to resist the temptation to make a fuss about something that didn’t work out. You can be there to support them and encourage them to develop a new self-image by positive reinforcement.

5. Encourage your teenager to join a support group

Your teen’s anxiety about social situations will be reduced if they are surrounded by friends and support. You will be able to overcome the negative voices if you surround yourself with people who are supportive.

Pay attention to the friends of your child. Encourage your child to surround themselves with positive people.

Encourage your teens to be supportive of their peers and look out for signs that they are experiencing isolation.

A therapist is a person they can talk to and who will listen to them without judgement. They can help them deal with anxiety and process their emotions in a safe environment.

You can also get help from a therapist to support your teen by creating a safe environment for you to express your frustrations and fears.

Click Here for more information about our Teens with Social Anxiety Group.

6. 6.Embrace discomfort

Social anxiety can make it feel like you are staring at the bottom of a swimming pool when you step into new situations. It’s tempting to just run away from discomfort and tiptoe into it.

Sometimes, it is better to jump in right away. Once the shock has subsided, the water feels cool and refreshing.

You can’t avoid all trigger situations, so your teen will feel some discomfort at first. Acceptance of discomfort can help teens recover quickly and make sense of the fact that they created it.

Encourage your child to accept being uncomfortable and to not be able to control the world around them. It is important that they learn to accept the world as it is. You can’t save them from all uncomfortable situations, but you can help to embrace them.

7. Practice makes perfect

You will get more comfortable with a situation the more you are exposed to it. Although your teenager may instinctively want to avoid stress, it is important to resist the urge to run. This will help them be more resilient and better prepared for future stress.

It can make them more at ease in the moment by practicing their responses to triggers. Your teen should think about all possible trigger scenarios and create a game plan that will help them succeed.

It will increase their tolerance to anxiety, similar to a vaccine.

They will find that even the worst fears are not practical and that it is possible to practice their skills.

Hope for Teens with Social Anxiety

Social anxiety does not have to control you. If teens follow these tips and allow themselves to grow, they can live life to its fullest.

We are here to help you in any way we can. Our goal is to support you whenever you need us, whether it’s through helpful blog posts or our highly-trained team caring therapists.

Learn how our Child Psychologists can help with your child’s anxiety.

 

Additional Reading for Teens with Social Anxiety

MBCT

Mindfulness Meditation Resources

Faq

People Also Ask

Related questions asked on Google:

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  • How can I help my 13 year old who is shy

 

Questions

Questions used across top search results:

  • GUIDANCE FOR PARENTS OF TEENAGERS: DOES YOUR SHY TEEN HAVE SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER?
  • How to Parent Teens With Social Anxiety
  • When Young People Suffer Social Anxiety Disorder: What Parents Can Do
  • How to help your child cope with social anxiety disorder
  • What is social anxiety in children?
  • How Do I Know If My Teen Has Social Anxiety?
  • How to Help Kids with Social Anxiety
  • When to get help for social anxiety
  • Social Anxiety: What Is It?
  • What is Social Anxiety?

 

teenage social anxiety Statistics

Factual sentences referenced across top search results:

  • The 2016 NIMH study found that around the age of 13, SAD emerges in approximately 12 percent of teenagers who identify as shy. (nationalsocialanxietycenter.com)
  • 3% of Teens Identify as Transgender or Gender Nonconforming in America (polaristeen.com)
  • In fact, children with social anxiety disorder are more likely than their peers without SAD to develop depression by age 15 and substance abuse by age 16 or 17. (careforyourmind.org)
  • At any given time approximately 7% of the population is suffering from social anxiety disorder (evolvetreatment.com)
  • Around 18% (40 million) of adults have an anxiety disorder. (evolvetreatment.com)
  • Around 8% (1.1 million) of children and adolescents experience the negative effects of an anxiety disorder. (evolvetreatment.com)
  • Specific research on SAD shows an estimated 7% of adolescents (just under 1 million) experience SAD symptoms. (evolvetreatment.com)
  • Weighted blankets are typically 10% of a child’s body weight, and you can make one yourself or buy them online. (biglifejournal.com)
  • Social anxiety disorder Around 1-9% of children and teenagers develop social anxiety disorder. (raisingchildren.net.au)
  • The median age at onset of social anxiety disorder is 13 years, and 75% have an age at onset between 8 and 15 years. (psycom.net)

 

 

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